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       Chapter IV: Land Use Policies, Capital City District

Transportation

This is a menu of the topics on this page (click on any): TRANSPORTATION INTRODUCTION    The Busway System Definition    Policies    The Road Network Description    Policies    The Pedestrian and Cycleway System    The Railway    The Airport   .

TRANSPORTATION

Introduction

The basic objective with respect to the establishment of transportation facilities in Dodoma is to maximize safety and efficiency, while keeping within reasonable economic limits. This can be accomplished by:

— the provision of a series of individual transportation and movement networks each of which caters to a particular modal demand, thereby reducing the number of conflict points; and

— the development of infrastructure sufficient to accommodate predicted demands, but sited within rights of way that will permit reasonable and economic expansion, should radical changes in demand occur.

plate13 The basic policy with regard to all transportation within the urban area of the new Capital should be to ensure that all areas will be served by a complete hierarchy of roads, public transit routes, cycle ways and pedestrian routes. In visual terms all systems will be subservient to the land and townscape and the main criteria governing their design will be safety, convenience and amenity.

The Busway System

Definition

The busway forms the spine of the linear pattern of development for the National Capital. It consists of a paved surface some 7 metres wide within a fenced or enclosed right-of-way of not less than 15 metres in width, that is reserved exclusively for buses. It is recommended that all buses should be of the high capacity, articulated type.

Policies

Vehicles other than approved buses, as well as pedestrians and cyclists should be prohibited from using the busway route. Grade separations should be provided at points of crossing with the railway and major or minor arterial roads.

Pedestrian and cycleway bridges and underpasses should be provided at all appropriate points on the busway route and where an at grade crossing is necessary with a convential road, the bus should be given priority by appropriate signing or traffic lights.

Bus stops should be provided at the centre of each residential community and at suitable points within the government, commercial and industrial areas of the city.

The Road Network

Description

The proposed road network is based on a hierarchy of streets as follows:

In addition to the foregoing, there wiil be certain routes designated as parkways and processional ways, which will have functions additional to the main purpose of carrying vehicular traffic between one part of the city and another. Special design features will be required for these routes.

Policies

The major arterial roadway pattern is a combination of the radial, ring, and linear systems. These main roads, which are located outside of all main residential areas, will permit rapid and convenient vehicular travel between all parts of the city. Points of access to these routes should be limited and space should be provided to enable grade separated interchanges to be constructed in the future where two arterial streets meet or cross. Roundabouts, traffic islands or traffic signals should be provided in the first instance. Bridges or underpass structures should eventually be provided at all crossings with the railway and busway.

Landscaping of all roads is most important, and special attention should be paid to this aspect from the outset. The character and function of a particular route will be reflected in the arrangement of the trees, shrubs and hedgerows selected.

The Pedestrian and Cycleway System

plate14 A major pedestrian/cycleway network will be provided running parallel to the busway system, and through the commercial, government and industrial areas and the urban open spaces. This network will accommodate the anticipated, heavy pedestrian and cyclist movements. In addition to, and complementing this system, will be exclusive networks of smaller pedestrian and cycle routes that lie within the communities and other major activity areas, permitting free and direct movement with a minimum of vehicular conflict.

Where applicable, pedestrian and cycleway facilities will be located within a right-of-way of not less than 5 metres and should have surface widths of not less than 3 metres. These surfaces, where possible, should be either gravelled or thinly paved.

The Railway

The present station and railway yards are unsatisfactorily located and the Future Land Use Plan shows a major shift in.these facilities. A new passenger station site is proposed 1 kilometre east of the present location and new freight sidings and railway sheds are proposed immediately west of the western industrial site.

The new passenger station will be located astride a realigned section of track and will provide five platforms each capable of taking an 18-car passenger train. This important building, closely related to the city busway terminus and the regional bus station, will be linked to the main government areas by a formal pedestrian park system.?

The Airport

The present airport located within the northern fringe of the town is unsatisfactory for modern high performance aircraft and it should be replaced as soon as possible.

The new airport site is located 10 kilometres north of the proposed urban limits, on the east side of the Arusha Road. An area of 36 square kilometres is reserved, which is sufficient to provide for full international standards and flight rules.

The location of the site has been carefully selected to be both convenient to the new Capital City and to minimize the effect of aircraft noise.

Uses which should ultimately be permitted at the airport include restaurants, offices, light industrial and storage buildings, but should exclude residential uses, other than those considered essential for specialized key workmen, such as police, health and fire services.

Building height and other zoning restrictions should be applied to the area around the airport, based upon international navigational safety requirements and noise standards.



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Copyright: Project Planning Associates Limited, Toronto, Canada, directed by Mr. Macklin Hancock and recipient "The Government of Tanzania, Capital Development Authority under the auspices of Mr. George Kahama.".